Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) Information

BACKGROUND

Emerald ash borer (EAB) is an exotic, invasive beetle that was first found killing ash trees near Detroit, Michigan and neighboring Windsor, Ontario in 2002. In 2009 EAB was discovered in Randolph, New York (Cattaraugus County.) EAB is native to Asia, but likely arrived in North America on solid wood packing material.EAB larvae feed under the bark of trees, disrupting the flow of nutrients and water.  Infested trees gradually die over a period of 2-4 years. All species of ash (Fraxinus spp.) are at risk of attack and death. 

EAB infestations, in their early stages, are difficult to detect and often go unnoticed until trees show signs of decline.  Infestations expand through the natural dispersion of flying adult beetles and through the artificial movement of EAB when carried in infested material (i.e., firewood and logs.) Satellite (nonconnected)  infestations can be created by both natural and artificial dispersal.  NYS has enacted an EAB quarantine to restrict the movement of “regulated articles”both within and beyond the 14 separate Restricted Zones established by the quarantine.

A Restricted Zone is a quarantine around an EAB infestation, and follows town lines. However, the distribution of EAB and infested areas throughout the restricted zones may not be uniform.  Movement of woody debris can be facilitated through a compliance agreement, or limited permit from the NYS Department of Agriculture & Markets (NYSDAM), especially for management purposes. 

Ash trees within known EAB infested areas are likely to be infested, even if they appear healthy. Therefore, special precautions are recommended for working with ash trees within these areas. These guidelines are intended to reduce the risk of the artificial movement of EAB, especially into noninfested areas.

NEW YORK EAB QUARANTINE

http://www.dec.ny.gov/animals/47761.html

NEW YORK FIREWOOD REGULATIONS

http://www.dec.ny.gov/animals/28722.html

REPORT NEW INFESTATIONS TO THE WEABTF (716/652-5400 X150) OR THE NYS DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL CONSERVATION (716/851-7010).

 Information in this section taken from Best Practices for Tree Care Professionals in Emerald Ash Borer Infested Area of WNY Factsheet prepared by NYS Department of Environmental Conservation Region 9 Forester Patrick Marren.

 

 

Last updated April 21, 2017